Meet Our Colleague: Trina O’Gorman

By Christa Verem

It’s my pleasure to introduce Trina O’Gorman, whom I’ve had the the privilege of seeing in action both in the classroom and the pick-up line at our kids’ elementary school. In this profile, Trina shares her love of travel and a testament to the power of journaling.

 

Trina O'Gorman

How did you get started teaching?

Teaching was not my first career. My decision to teach came later in life. I returned to college in my early 30s to earn my MAT in Teaching Secondary English, a decision that had more to do with a desire to connect to and do something for others or generativity, rather than a desire to “teach English” or a love for a particular content area. I love people and the power of writing.

What do you appreciate about teaching?

I appreciate the opportunity to share my experiences with my students and to empower them by helping them understand the process of writing, which I think is largely about understanding their own thinking and values and the thinking and values of others. And I learn so much from my students. I think teaching is such an amazing opportunity to affect positive change, but also to honor our humanity. Continue reading

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FYW Newsletter (April)

FYW Newsletter

Resources

FYW Sandbox Module: Lectures & Scholarly Resources–Critical lenses, Drafting, MLA & Fair Use

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Dates & Deadlines

The Major Launch Party is Wednesday, April 3, from 12 – 1 p.m.  in the College Writing Workshop (Schmitt 132)–send your students!

 

Dept. Meetings

  • April 3 @ 2:30 p.m./ Schmitt 104
  • May 1 @ 2:30 p.m./ Location TBA

Other

  • President’s Address to the University Community/ April 24 @ 3 p.m.  

Continue reading

Meet Our Colleague: Kathy Curto

By Christa Verem

Welcome to Deep Down in the Classroom’s newest feature Meet Our Colleague, where we showcase the teachers that inspire our students daily. For our inaugural profile we’re spending time with Kathy Curto, whose book Not for Nothing: Glimpses Into a Jersey Girlhood was published December, 2018. Read on to learn more about Kathy, her teaching beginnings, and how she finds time for her passions and the paper load.

Kathy Curto

How did you get started teaching?

I discovered teaching back in 2004 when my youngest child turned four, I re-entered the full-time, out-of-the-home workforce and took a job as a professor of sociology at a small college in Rockland County, New York. About six years into this job, I returned to grad school and earned the MFA so I could teach writing at the college level as well. (My first career out of college and grad school in the early 90s was social work. I was Program Director at a community- based organization in the South Bronx.) Continue reading

FYW Newsletter (March 2019)

FYW Newsletter

Resources

FYW Sandbox Module: Lectures & Scholarly Resources–Critical lenses, Drafting, MLA & Fair Use

________________________________________________________

Dates & Deadlines

Dept. Meetings

  • March 6 @ 2:30 p.m. / SBUS 015
  • April 3 @ 2:30 p.m./ Schmitt 104
  • May 1 @ 2:30 p.m./ Location TBA

Other

  • President’s Address to the University Community/ April 24 @ 3 p.m.  

Professional Development

  • Emotional support for students / Our colleagues from Counseling and Psychological Services & Disability Resource Center

Thursday, March 28 / 1:00-2:15 / Schmitt 104

  • What can ESL / L2 learners teach us about good pedagogy?

           Jamie Dritt / Wednesday, April 3 / 11:30-12:45/ Schmitt 104

  • Book Club / Bad Ideas About Writing / Listserv discussion prompts

          Wednesday, March 20 / online

          Tuesday, April 2 / online

Continue reading

ESL/EAL resources and practice

As you may have noticed, the recent FYW Newsletter contained these links to resources for helping students who need ESL/EAL support:

Resources

Since this is a very large set of resources, here are a couple follow-up questions (from Mike Laser) about experiences with using them:

Have you had especial success using any of these (or other) resources? Which ones did you find particularly useful? Which ones were most user-friendly (for faculty and for students)?

Please post responses below or email them to me and I’ll post them here.

Thanks!

Syllabus Day

By Melissa Adamo

Syllabus day. That magical time when professors read the syllabus at students until their eyes glaze over. No wonder they never remember anything from the syllabus or feel motivated to look back at it ever again.

Over the past couple of years, I have tried to make syllabus day more interactive. I’ve told students to highlight specific policies that they knew they’d personally need to remember (for example, late policies for those who struggle with punctuality). I told them to take notes, reframe parts in their own words, jot down questions as I go through it with them. I wanted to show them that the syllabus was a text like any other we would read in our class and to have them start practicing active reading skills on day one. Although this lesson was more helpful in engaging students compared to when I simply read through the syllabus quickly (boring even myself), I could tell I was still losing their attention.

This year I tried something different.

Inspired by Lisa Blankenship’s professional development last semester, when we worked in groups to examine language on a syllabus that might excluded some students, I asked my students to critique my syllabus in a similar fashion. Continue reading